High Altitudes

NCF and the Snow Leopard Trust work together in India’s high altitudes, striving to help conserve the snow leopard – as well as the diversity of life & landscapes that this beautiful cat symbolizes – in a scientifically robust and socially responsible manner. We combine research, community involvement, conservation education, and policy-level dimensions.

Ecology

Studies on the ecology of animals and their ecosystems for effective conservation

Dsc 1033

Shared pastures

How mountain ungulates of the trans-Himalaya live together

Walking 20snow 20leopard 20sign 20transect 20above 205 000m

Snow leopard and prey distribution

Factors affecting snow leopard & wild-prey at multiple scales 

Sl 20cam 20trap 201

Snow leopard - prey dynamics

Understanding impact of wild prey availability on snow leopard killing livestock

Conservation

Spiti1 20%2843%29

Freeing up pastures

Communities set aside grazing exclosures to help revive wild ungulate habitat

Dscn9469

People, livestock and snow leopards

Unique livestock insurance schemes betters prospects for herders and carnivores

Shen 20logo 20  20315x210

Shen

An initiative of Snow Leopard Enterprises

People-wildlife interface

Management

Dsc04574

From science to policy

Project Snow Leopard: towards a national conservation policy

People

Funding

Publications

  • Journal Article
    In press
    Local community neutralizes traditional wolf traps and builds a stupa
    Oryx
  • Report
    2018
    Understanding distribution, population density and conservation status of the endemic and threatened Ladakh urial Ovis orientalis vignei
    Download

    PDF, 2.93 MB

  • Book Chapter
    2018
    Living with Snow Leopards: a pluralistic approach to conservation
    In Conservation from the Margins. (Eds) Umesh Srinivasan & Nandini Velho. Orient Blackswan
    Download

    PDF, 1.68 MB

  • Report
    2018
    Population assessment of the Nilgiri tahr (Nilgiritragus hylocrius) using the Double-observer Survey method in the Anamalai Tiger Reserve
    Technical Report, Nature Conservation Foundation, Mysore, India
    Download

    PDF, 4.59 MB

  • Popular Article
    2018
    When shepherds must kill their lambs
    Sanctuary Asia, August issue, Pages 71-72
    Download

    PDF, 1.39 MB

  • Conference Proceedings
    2018
    Snow leopard and prey: Landscape-level distribution modeling & impacts of migratory livestock grazing in Symposium Assimilated Knowledges: an integrated approach to conservation in snow leopard landscapes
    Conservation Asia, 2018, Society for Conservation Biology
  • Book Chapter
    2018
    Large Carnivore and Conservation and Management
    Charudutt Mishra, justine Shanti Alexander, Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Orjan Johansson, Koustubh Sharma, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, Muhammad Ali Nawaz, Gustaf Samelius
    Download

    PDF, 1.44 MB

  • Journal Article
    2017
    Commensal in conflict: Livestock depredation patterns by free-ranging domestic dogs in the Upper Spiti Landscape, Himachal Pradesh, India
    Chandrima Home, Ranjana Pal, Rishi Kumar Sharma, Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Abi Tamim Vanak
    Ambio: doi:10.1007/s13280-016-0858-6
    Download

    PDF, 1.89 MB

    In human-populated landscapes worldwide, domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) are the most abundant terrestrial carnivore. Although dogs have been used for the protection of livestock from wild carnivores, they have also been implicated as predators of livestock. We used a combination of methods (field surveys, interview surveys, and data from secondary sources) to examine the patterns and factors driving livestock depredation by free-ranging dogs, as well as economic losses to local communities in a Trans-Himalayan agro-pastoralist landscape in India. Our results show that livestock abundance was a better predictor of depredation in the villages than local dog abundance. Dogs mainly killed small-bodied livestock and sheep were the most selected prey. Dogs were responsible for the majority of livestock losses, with losses being comparable to that by snow leopards. This high level of conflict may disrupt community benefits from conservation programs and potentially undermine the conservation efforts in the region through a range of cascading effects.

  • Journal Article
    2017
    Snow Leopard, Ecology and Conservation Issues in India
    Resonance, Indian Academy of Sciences, DOI 10.1007/s12045-017-0511-0
    Download

    PDF, 704 KB

    Snow leopard, an elusive mammal species of the cat family, is the top-predator of the Central and South Asian, highaltitude ecosystem. Snow leopards occur at low densities across the Central Asian mountains and the Indian Himalayan region. Owing to their secretive nature and inaccessible habitat, little is known about its ecology and distribution. Due to its endangered status and high aesthetic value, the snow leopard is considered as an ‘umbrella species’ for wildlife conservation in the Indian Himalayas. This article summarizes the current knowledge on snow leopard ecology and conservation issues in the Indian context.

  • Dataset
    2017
    Data from: Impact of wild prey availability on livestock predation by snow leopards
    Kulbhushansingh Suryawanshi, Steve Redpath, Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Uma Ramakrishnan, Vaibhav Chaturvedi, Sophie Smout, Charudutt Mishra
    Data Dryad: doi:10.5061/dryad.8p689

Did you know your internet explorer is out of date?

To access our website you should upgrade to a newer version or other web browser.

How to do that »